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Obscure tradition of hunting mistletoe in South Jersey forests endures

Joe Arsenault poses for a portrait near mistletoe plants

Joe Arsenault poses for a portrait near mistletoe plants growing in trees at Malaga Lake Park in Franklin Township on Saturday. Arsenault, a plant ecologist, uses Google Earth and coordinates from other botanists to find Mistletoe. (Noah Addis/For The Star-Ledger)

Mistletoe is most often found dangling over doorways at Christmastime, customarily with the promise of a kiss.But the rare plant also drapes the forests of South Jersey, growing in twisted tree limbs 50 to 60 feet in the air. The trick is getting to it. Read the entire article

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